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Detection of TTSuV in diarrheic piglet fecal samples positive or negative for porcine group A rotavirus

Under the conditions of this study, fecal shedding of TTSuV is independent of PoRVA infection in diarrheic piglets aged 1 to 3 weeks.

Wednesday 26 November 2014 (3 years 10 months 24 days ago)
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Association of Torque teno sus virus (TTSuV) and porcine group A rotavirus (PoRVA) was evaluated in PoRVA-positive or PoRVA-negative diarrheic piglet fecal samples. In total, 144 piglet diarrheic fecal samples were included in this study. Fecal samples from diarrheic piglets originated from a total of 43 pig herds located in the South (n = 61), Midwest (n = 38), and Southeast (n = 45) Brazilian regions. Fifty-two PoRVA-positive and 92 PoRVA-negative diarrheic fecal samples were included from piglets in their first week of life (0 to 7 days of age, n = 43), second week of life (8 to 14 days of age, n = 48), and third week of life (15 to 21 days of age, n = 53). The distribution of samples by their date of collection was 16 for 2004, 10 for 2005, 13 for 2006, 20 for 2007, six for 2008, three for 2009, four for 2010, 46 for 2011, and 26 for 2012.

Of the 144 diarrheic suckling piglet fecal samples included in this study, 48.6% (70) were positive for TTSuV. The specificity of the amplicons obtained for each TTSuV genus was confirmed during sequence analysis. The detection rate for TTSuV1 was higher (P < .05) than that for either TTSuV2 or a combination of both genera in both groups evaluated (PoRVA-positive and PoRVA-negative samples). However, TTSuV1, TTSuV2, or co-infection detection rates did not differ between the PoRVA-positive and PoRVA-negative groups (P > .05). The TTSuV was most frequently detected in samples from piglets during their first week of life (55.8%; 24 of 43), followed by animals at the second (47.9%; 23 of 48) and third weeks of life (43.4%; 23 of 53).

Under the conditions of this study, fecal shedding of TTSuV is independent of PoRVA infection in diarrheic piglets aged 1 to 3 weeks. Considering that porcine enteric viral agents are common throughout the pork industry and that the maintenance of pig intestinal health is essential to ensure productivity, continued surveillance for viral enteric infections and their potential associations cannot be ignored.

de Arruda Leme R, Lorenzetti E, Alfieri AF, et al. Detection of Torque teno sus virus in diarrheic piglet fecal samples positive or negative for porcine group A rotavirus. J Swine Health Prod. 2014;22(6): 287–290.

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