Dietary calcium level as calcium carbonate does not affect the apparent total tract digestibility of calcium, but reduces digestibility of phosphorus by growing pigs

The greatest values for apparent total tract digestibility of P are obtained when the dietary Ca to P ratio is around 1.1:1.

Tuesday 8 November 2011 (7 years 9 months 15 days ago)
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An experiment was conducted to test if the concentration of dietary Ca affects the digestibility of Ca or P in diets fed to growing pigs. Six diets based on corn, potato protein isolate, cornstarch, and soybean oil were formulated. All diets also contained monosodium phosphate, crystalline AA, salt, and a vitamin-micro mineral premix. The only difference among the diets was that varying concentrations of calcium carbonate to create diets containing 0.33, 0.46, 0.51, 0.67, 0.92, and 1.04% Ca. All diets contained between 0.40 and 0.43% P. Pigs were placed in metabolism cages that allowed total, but separate, collection of feces and urine from the pigs. Pigs within each 12 replicate were randomly allotted to the 6 diets and fed experimental diets for 14 d with urine and feces being collected over a 5-d period. Diets, feces, and urine samples were analyzed for Ca and P, and the daily balance, the apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD), and the retention of Ca and P were calculated.

Results indicated that intake, fecal excretion, and urinary excretion of Ca increased (linear, P < 0.05) as dietary Ca concentration increased. The daily intake of P was not affected by the dietary concentration of Ca, but fecal excretion of P increased (linear, P < 0.05) as dietary Ca concentrations increased. In contrast, urinary P output was reduced (linear, P < 0.05) as dietary Ca increased. The retention of Ca increased (linear, P < 0.05) from 1.73 to 4.60 g/d, whereas the retention of P decreased (linear, P < 0.05) from 1.98 to 1.77 g/d as dietary Ca concentrations increased. However, if calculated as percent of intake, both Ca and P retention were reduced (linear, P < 0.05) as dietary Ca concentration increased (from 55.4 to 46.1% and from 48.4 to 43.5%, respectively). The ATTD of Ca was not affected by the dietary concentration of Ca, but the ATTD of P was reduced (linear, P < 0.05) from 56.9 to 46.2% as dietary Ca concentration increased.
It is concluded that the dietary concentration of Ca does not affect the ATTD of Ca in calcium carbonate, but elevated concentrations of dietary Ca may reduce the ATTD of P in diets based on corn, potato protein isolate, and monosodium phosphate.

HH Stein, O Adeola, GL Cromwell, SW Kim, DC Mahan and PS Miller, 2011. Journal of Animal Science, 89(7): 2139-2144. http://dx.doi.org/10.2527/jas.2010-3522

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