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Fermented garlic powder in weanling pigs

The use of 0.5 g/Kg of fermented garlic powder in the diet may improve ADG and ADFI in weanling pigs.

Thursday 12 December 2013 (4 years 10 months 5 days ago)
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Garlic (Allium sativum L.) has been widely used as an herbal remedy to prevent various heart and metabolic diseases. Various experiments have reported that garlic bulb, paste, oil, powder, husk and leaves could positively affect the animal production performance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of fermented garlic powder (FGP) on growth performance, nutrient digestibility, blood characteristics and faecal microbial concentration in weanling pigs. A total of 144 commercially crossed [(Duroc x Yorkshire) x Landrace] piglets (weaned at day 21) with an average initial BW of 5.5 ± 0.40 kg were randomly allocated to four treatments according to sex and initial BW. Pigs were used in a 5-week trial to evaluate the effect of fermented garlic powder supplementation. The dietary treatments were: (i) control (CON; basal diet), (ii) FGP0.5 (CON + 0.5 g/kg FGP), (iii) FGP1 (CON + 1 g/kg FGP), (iv) FGP2 (CON + 2 g/kg FGP). There were six replications with six pigs (three barrows and three gilts) per pen and were used in a randomized complete block design.

Pigs fed FGP 0.5 treatments increased (P < 0.05) average daily gain (ADG) and average daily feed intake (ADFI) during 3–5 and 0–5 week. No difference was observed on gain/ feed (G/F) ratio in this study. The inclusion of FGP1 and FGP2 treatments increased DM (P < 0.05) digestibility compared with the CON treatment throughout the experiment. The apparent total tract digestibility of N was (P < 0.05) increased by the dietary FGP throughout the experiment. Pigs fed FGP1 and FGP2 treatments increased the lymphocyte concentration (P < 0.05) and RBC concentration compared with the CON group. Dietary FGP decreased the blood total cholesterol (P < 0.05) in comparison with the CON group. The triglyceride (P < 0.05) concentration was decreased in FGP1 and FGP2 treatments compared with those in the CON treatment at the end of the experiment. Pigs fed FGP1 and FGP2 treatments had a lower number of Escherichia coli in faeces on 21 (P < 0.05) and 35 days (P = 0.05) than those in the CON treatment.

In conclusion, dietary fermented garlic powder (0.5 g/kg) can improve ADG and ADFI in weanling pigs, but not at higher levels (1 and 2 g/kg). Dietary fermented garlic powder can also increase the nutrient digestibility, lymphocytes and RBC concentrations, but decrease the faecal E. coli concentration in weaning pigs.

L. Yan and I. H. Kim. (2013). Effects of dietary supplementation of fermented garlic powder on growth performance, apparent total tract digestibility, blood characteristics and faecal microbial concentration in weanling pigs. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition 97;457–464. DOI: 10.1111/j.1439-0396.2012.01286.x

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