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Germany: drop in the sales of antibiotics for animals

In 2014, 214 tonnes less than in 2013 were sold (approximately 15% less), and almost 468 tonnes less (some 27% less) in comparison with early 2011.

Tuesday 8 September 2015 (2 years 9 months 11 days ago)

According to the data published by the German Consumer Protection and Food Safety Federal Office (Bundesamt für Verbraucherschutz und Lebensmittelsicherheit, BVL), the sales of antibiotics used in veterinary medicine are still falling.

In 2014, 214 tonnes less than in 2013 were sold (approximately 15% less), and almost 468 tonnes less (some 27% less) in comparison with early 2011. Nevertheless, the amount of certain antibiotics that are important in human therapy (e.g. cephalosporins, and 3rd and 4th generation fluoroquinolones) has not dropped and has remained at the same level as in 2014.

1,238 tonnes were sold in total in 2014. The most sold antibiotics were, just as during the previous year, penicillin (almost 450 tonnes) and tetracyclins (342 tonnes), followed by sulfonamides (121 tonnes), macrolides (109 tonnes), and polypeptide antibiotics (colistin) (107 tonnes).

 

Tuesday, 28 July 2015/ BVL/ Germany.
http://www.bvl.bund.de

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