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FAO: steady increase in incidents of low levels of GM crops in traded food and feed

The incidents have led to trade disruptions between countries with shipments of grain, cereal and other crops being blocked by importing countries and destroyed or returned to the country of origin.

Tuesday 25 March 2014 (3 years 10 months 27 days ago)

The increased production of genetically modified crops around the globe has led to a higher number of incidents of low levels of GMOs being detected in traded food and feed, FAO said.

The incidents have led to trade disruptions between countries with shipments of grain, cereal and other crops being blocked by importing countries and destroyed or returned to the country of origin.

The trace amounts of GM crops become mixed with non-GM food and feed crops by accident during field production (for example, a field trial of a GM crop grown near a field of a non-GM crop), processing, packing, storage and transportation.

There is no international agreement defining or quantifying "low level", therefore the interpretation varies from country to country. In many countries it is interpreted as any level at which detection is possible i.e. very low trace levels while in other countries case-by-case decisions are taken on what level is acceptable.

The GM crop in question may be authorized for commercial use or sale in one or more countries but not yet authorized in an importing country. Therefore, if the importing country detects the unauthorized crop, it may be legally obliged to reject the shipment.

In the first survey of its kind, 75 out of 193 FAO member countries responded to questions on low levels of GM crops in international food and animal feed trade.

The survey reveals:

  • respondents reported 198 incidents of low levels of GM crops mixed into non-GM crops between 2002 and 2012;
  • there was a jump in cases between 2009 and 2012, when 138 out of the 198 incidents were reported;
  • shipments with low levels of GM crops originated mainly from the US, Canada and China, although other countries also accidently shipped such crops;
  • once detected, most shipments were destroyed or returned to the exporting country;
  • the highest number of incidents involved linseed, rice, maize and papaya;

Other survey findings include:

  • 30 countries produce GM crops, either for research or commercial production or both, and more GM crops are being developed;
  • 17 countries do not have any food safety, feed safety or environmental regulations on GM crops;
  • 55 countries have zero-tolerance policy for unauthorized GM crops;
  • 38 countries consider the different policies on GMOs existing between trading partners is an important factor in contributing to the trade risk posed by the presence of low levels of GM crops in some traded foods.

Thursday March 13, 2014/ FAO.
http.//www.fao.org

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