South Korea - With FMD over, new precautions unveiled by gov’t

Declaring that the nation’s worst foot-and-mouth outbreak was over, the government announced a new measure to tighten its oversight of the livestock industry, requiring farmers to apply for permits to operate cattle and pig farms starting next year.
Tuesday 29 March 2011 (7 years 5 months 23 days ago)
Like
Declaring that the nation’s worst foot-and-mouth outbreak was over, the government announced a new measure to tighten its oversight of the livestock industry, requiring farmers to apply for permits to operate cattle and pig farms starting next year.

Following a discussion with the ruling Grand National Party, the Lee Myung-bak administration admitted that it failed to properly handle the FMD outbreaks at an early stage. The disease, which swept across the nation except for Jeolla and Jeju since November, cost the government 3 trillion won ($2.7 billion), Prime Minister Kim Hwang-sik said in a press conference.

The government has lowered the alert level for the disease, Kim said, adding that authorities are now able to control the situation. Starting next year, only farmers who have proper facilities and who have completed education programs on epizootic preventive measures will be given permits to operate cattle and pig farms. The government said the permit system will be adopted for large-scale farmers, while small-scale farmers will need to register with their local authorities, detailing their farming of chickens, ducks, cattle and pigs. The government said more details on the permit system, including who will be considered large-scale farmers, will be determined by the end of next month.

Under the new plan, the government will also hold farmers accountable for outbreaks after conducting probes on their fulfillment of prevention efforts. A new standard of compensation will also be used to take into account the outbreak time, period and scope of loss, rather than paying uniform compensation based on the number of culled animals.

Farmers will also be required to partially pay for vaccinations. Local governments will also be required to help pay for culled animal disposals. Conspicuously missing was a plan to impose a ceiling on the number of animals that can be raised on large-scale livestock farms. Government sources said earlier this month that a plan to change factory-style farming practices was being considered as a way to prevent disease outbreaks.

http://joongangdaily.joins.com/article/view.asp?aid=2933937

Swine news

Russia: Positive balance of the agricultural sector in 201607-Jun-2017 1 years 3 months 14 days ago

Article Comments

This area is not intended to be a place to consult authors about their articles, but rather a place for open discussion among pig333.com users.
Leave a new Comment

Access restricted to 333 users. In order to post a comment you must be logged in.

Not a registered user of 333?sign upand access swine prices, the search engine, ...
It is fast and free
Are you registered in 333?LOGINIf you've forgotten your password we'll send it to you here

tags

Swine News

Swine industry news in your email

You are not subscribed to this list

14-Sep-201807-Sep-201827-Jul-201820-Jul-2018

Log in and sign up on the list

Not a registered user of 333?sign upand access swine prices, the search engine, ...
It is fast and free
Are you registered in 333?LOGINIf you've forgotten your password we'll send it to you here