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The FAO and OIE have the 2012-2016 plan to combat trans-boundary animal diseases in the Americas

The Global Framework for the Progressive Control of Trans-boundary Animal Diseases (GF-TADs) presented its 2012-2016 action plan for America to the FAO Regional Office.

Friday 7 September 2012 (5 years 5 months 15 days ago)

The Global Framework for the Progressive Control of Trans-boundary Animal Diseases (GF-TADs) presented its 2012-2016 action plan for America to the FAO Regional Office.

According to the FAO, demand for meat is expected to increase by 76% by 2050, while demand for dairy products will increase by 62%. The world will have to produce 65% more eggs than at present to meet the growing demand.

The GF-TADs is a joint initiative of FAO and the World Organization for Animal Health, OIE, which seeks to control and eradicate the most significant animal diseases, including those transmissible to humans.

The impact of these diseases can be devastating to the national economy: in 1998 it was estimated that in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua annual losses due to mortality of pigs totaled $ 20 million. Outbreaks of FMD, in turn, cause an estimated annual global loss of $ 5,000 million.

The livestock sector accounts for 46% of agricultural GDP and veterinary services contribute to the protection of that heritage, but public and private investment in the sector is still very low.

Action Plan 2012-2016

Meeting in Santiago, members of the GF-TADs defined plan strategies for the Americas, which seeks to facilitate collaboration and to maximize synergies between international organizations and the countries of the region.

The GF-TADs plan also includes preventing the occurrence of emerging diseases in animals and reduction of the effects on production, animal health, public health, livelihoods and economies of the region.


Similarly, the plan seeks to promote good governance of Veterinary Services, ensuring funding and strengthening their capacities, in order to reduce potential risks of trans-boundary animal diseases on the food security of vulnerable communities.

Priority diseases to the Americas

The GF-TADs for the Americas was established in 2005 to meet the region's priority diseases: foot and mouth disease (FMD), bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), screwworm (NWS), highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI), classical swine fever (CSF) and rabies (R).

Tuesday July 24, 2012/ FAO.
http://www.fao.org

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