Read this article in:

The genetic correlation between scapula shape and shoulder lesions in sows

It is expected to improve the genetic progress of shoulder lesions and body condition score.

Tuesday 10 July 2018 (4 months 5 days ago)
Like

Shoulder lesions and body condition of sows at weaning have both environmental and genetic causes. The traits can be scored at farm level, and following recording, the traits can be included in the breeding goal and directional selection can be applied. However, to further increase the genetic progress of these traits, it is advantageous to develop indicator traits on the selection candidates (test boars or gilts, not yet exhibiting the phenotype themselves). It has previously been suggested that the scapula morphology and the spine of scapula might be a key factor for the sow to develop shoulder lesions. In this study, we developed 11 novel traits describing the morphology of the shoulder blade based on computed tomography images from scanned test boars. These traits include the area, length, width, height, and volume of the shoulder blade as well as 6 traits obtained from principal component analysis, describing 80% of the variation observed for the scapula spine profile.

The analyzed traits have moderate to high heritability (h2 from 0.29 to 0.78, SE = 0.06), low to medium genetic correlations with shoulder lesions (up to 0.4, SE = 0.1), and body condition scoring at weaning (up to 0.25, SE = 0.1). These novel phenotypes can now be recorded automatically and accurately prior to selection of the AI boars.

If such recordings are included in multivariate genomic selection models, it is expected to improve the genetic progress of shoulder lesions and body condition score by weaning.

Ø Nordbø, L E Gangsei, T Aasmundstad, E Grindflek, J Kongsro; The genetic correlation between scapula shape and shoulder lesions in sows, Journal of Animal Science, Volume 96, Issue 4, 14 April 2018, Pages 1237–1245, https://doi.org/10.1093/jas/sky051

Article Comments

This area is not intended to be a place to consult authors about their articles, but rather a place for open discussion among pig333.com users.
Leave a new Comment

Access restricted to 333 users. In order to post a comment you must be logged in.

Not a registered user of 333?sign upand access swine prices, the search engine, ...
It is fast and free
Are you registered in 333?LOGINIf you've forgotten your password we'll send it to you here

tags