Teschen disease

Commonly Teschovirus do not produce clinical cases, but there are very virulent strains that affect the central nervous system.

Alternative names: Teschen disease, Talfan disease, benign enzootic paresis, poliomyelitis suum, Teschovirus encephalomyelitis, Teschen / Talfan

Information

It is caused by porcine Teschovirus. There are 11 serotypes with diverse virulence. Probably this virus exists worldwide, but most infections are subclinical and clinical disease outbreaks are rare.

Natural infection occurs by ingestion of the virus, which multiplies in the intestine and is excreted in large quantities in the feces. Is relatively resistant, it can survive outside the body and is highly infectious.

The more virulent strains produce Teschen disease that causes poliencefalomyelitis with high morbidity and mortality, affecting pigs of all ages. Mild forms cause Talfan disease.

 

Symptoms

All ages

  • It is often subclinical.
  • Lack of coordination.
  • It can advance to total paralysis.
  • Normal temperature.
  • In severe cases motor nerves are totally destroyed and the disease is irreversible.

Causes /contributing factors

  • Poor hygiene (dirty surfaces, contamination of water).
  • Environmental contamination and spreading in the swine farm by boots, brushes, instruments, clothing, etc.
  • Spread between herds by movement of young pigs who are subclinical carriers.
  • Transmission by feces and contaminated equipment, trucks, etc.

 

Diagnosis

  • Clinical signs are suggestive but not conclusive. They can take samples of serum to demonstrate the increase in antibody titer in paired blood samples. Unique blood samples are not suitable because subclinical infection is relatively common and therefore very often these samples test positive even when the disease has not been observed.
  • Microscopic examination of the brain and spinal cord from slaughtered pigs show typical lesions of any virus but are not specific to the Teschen disease. Identification of the virus by isolation or by PCR.

 

Control/Prevention

  • There is no effective treatment.
  • Vaccination.
  • Swine Teschovirus can survive in the environment for months, it is needed to clean and disinfect facilities.
  • Quarantine to limit its spread.
  • Stamping out in severe cases.